Friday, June 30, 2017

Are You Suitable For A Siamese Cat?

Are You Suitable For A Siamese Cat?


As you must know by now, the appalling news of “Woman found with 94 Cats in a 3 room flat in Sengkang…” here in sunny Singapore has shocked every Cat lover and animal lovers alike. The opinions for this matter may be subjective to an individual. As a majority of them had distinctive seal-point markings, it made people ponder the following questions; Was she a breeder? Or could she actually be a kind soul with an undeniably strong love for the Siamese Cat breed?
Woman found with 94 cats in flat singapore
Source
Either way, we can all agree on one thing; the Cats were not living under great conditions, and that’s just not right. With all the Cats in that house now rescued (with a group named Saving The Siameses and Cat Welfare Society), there are plans to re-home them in better environments. Thinking of adopting one? Please read on to learn how if you are suited for a Siamese Cat breed, before anything else!



The Siamese Cat


The Siamese Cat originates from Thailand, which was previously known as Siam (hence the name Siamese) and are also believed to be descendants of the Wichienmaat Cats. First documented records of these Cats were in Tamra Maew (The Cat Book Poems), a manuscript that possibly dates as far back as the Ayutthata Kingdom during 1351 to 1767 AD. There are a number of extremely interesting legends that follow the elusive Siamese Cat.
Siamese Cat Tamra Maew History
The Siamese (top right) as depicted in Tamra Maew
One of which is how the war between the Siamese and Burmese leading to the downfall of the Ayuttata Kingdom as one of the reasons how the Burmese King obtained The Cat Book Poems and learnt about these special Cats in Siam. Thereafter he instructed his men to round up these Cats along with other treasures.

King Ananda and Siamese Cat
Thai Royalty with Siamese Cats
The earlier Siamese Cats almost all had a kink (a sharp twist or curve) in their tails, and another interesting legend depicts how Siamese Cats that lived with Royals in Siam used to protect their Princess’s belongings such as rings. By slipping the rings on their tails, they grew to eventually develop kinks at the tip of their tails, to prevent the precious rings from slipping off! Which legend did you like best?

Siamese with kinked tail singapore
Siamese Cat with a kinked tail
The 1st Siamese Cat to reach the shores of America was a Kitty named Siam in 1878, as a gift to President Rutherford B. Hayes (19th President of the United States). Siamese were also well-loved by the Royal family of Thailand, dubbed as “Royal Cat of Siam” Being amongst the first few recognized Asian Cat breeds, the Siamese Cat’s popularity began to increase throughout the years within the 19th century. It became one of the most popular Cat breeds in Europe and North America, and also a contributing breed foundation for the Himalayan, Tonkinese and Balinese Cat.



What Does A Saimese Cat Look Like?


Careful selective breeding has led to two different types of the Siamese Cat, namely the Traditional and the Modern. Traditional Siamese are differentiated by their cobbier heads and bodies, while Modern Siamese Cats are developed to have slender, longer bodies, accompanied with Apple-heads with larger and wider-set ears. The Modern Siamese Cats are also favoured as a Cat-show standard. Siamese Cats are most recognisable for their point-colouration and blue almond shaped eyes.

Modern Siamese Cats Singapore
Modern Siamese Cats
The point-colouration of the Siamese is a result associated with part-Albinism, resulting in a mutated enzyme which is heat-sensitive. This causes the cooler parts of the Siamese Cat to darken in colour, i.e. nose, tails, ears and feet (how cool indeed!) Though the earlier Siamese Cats only have Brown-Black points, careful breeding as developed a variety of point colouration such as Lilac, Lynx (Tabby), Red and Cream, Blue, Chocolate and Tortie (Tortoise-shell) seal points.
Lilac Point Siamese Cat Singapore Pets
A Lilac-point Siamese



Fun Fact      All Siamese kittens are born fully White or Cream in colour, with seal-points developing during the first few months. Substantial colouration could be determined after 4 weeks from birth, although an Adult Siamese can darken in time, according to the climate of their environments.
Siamese kittens in Singapore
Siamese kittens


Grooming Needs Of A Siamese Cat


The coat of a Siamese Cat is short, fine and glossy, requiring the most basic of grooming requirements to maintain. Besides the regular baths to keep their coats fresh and clean, you’d have to brush them at least once or twice per week.
Traditional Siamese Cat
Source
Other grooming needs include trimming of their nails once every two weeks or so, dental hygiene and cleaning of their ears and eyes to prevent excess dirt and wax build-up. While doing so, always remember to use a Vet-approved Ear cleaner and cotton ball. If you are unsure on how to perform these tasks, seek for advice and demonstrations from your trusted Veterinarian or Groomer



Siamese Cat Personality


First and foremost, this is a Cat breed that thrives on Human attention and affection. The Siamese should basically be your best friend in a Cat’s body, because they can get pretty vocal and butt in on your business at home. 
Traditional Siamese Cat breed Singapore
Source
Curious, outgoing, intelligent and playful, a Siamese often becomes extremely bonded with one person in the house, and does not take too lightly on being neglected. In fact, they fall into depression from loneliness if left alone for too long.



Owning A Siamese Cat In Singapore


It’s possible to own a Siamese Cat in Singapore of course, however a Siamese is not for everybody. Their crave for Human attention must not be taken lightly, and that gets especially tough if your Siamese develops a close bond with just one person! With that said, a Siamese Cat is unequivocally not suitable for someone with a busy lifestyle. If you have work in the day for example, keep your Siamese entertained by providing lots of brain stimulating toys.

Lady and the Tramp Siamese Cat Song
Si and Am: Disney's Lady and the Tramp
Some owners have also opted to own two Siamese kitties instead of one, to keep each other company (hmm…like Siamese twins?) You can understand why we’re stressing on the importance of not neglecting them now, right? As with all Pets, research and preparation has to be done prior to obtaining one, this is to ensure that you’ll be providing a safe and loving home for them and understanding their behaviour in order to avoid any possible setbacks that may lead to abandonment (like character incompatibility, financial expenses). With proper love and care, a Siamese Cat can live up to 15 years or more!



Adopt, Don’t Shop


Specific breeds are great, but we could say the same for all other crossbreeds and rescued strays. Before you head off to purchase a Pet, always keep an eye out for adoption drives or check out local shelters and groups for more options. You could always count on finding your next sweet kitty and providing a forever home for a rescued furry pal ☺



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