Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Guinea Pig Behaviour: What Is My Guinea Pig Trying To Say?

Guinea Pig Behaviour: What Is My Guinea Pig Trying To Say?


Wouldn’t you love to have a slight clue to what your Pet is trying to say? This thought also applies to small domesticated animals like Guinea Pigs— they too, have their own set of intricate behaviours and personalities. Learning and discerning these body languages can bring about a happier Pet-Owner relationship, greatly reducing the chances of misunderstanding and/or regrettable actions.
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So until an incredible device is built for translating the common tongue for specific Pets, take a look at the following guide with 10 common signs you can read off your Guinea Pigs! To make matters simpler, we have categorized them into two segments, Body Language, and Sounds.



Body Language


1. Staring Into Blank Space  Okay, we all have moments where we daydream, or "space out". You'd notice that our Cavy buddies are experts at that, except for the fact that they aren't really spacing out. As prey animals, keeping their eyes peeled and staying alert is just one crucial key to survival in the wild. 


Fun Fact #1      Guinea Pigs take frequent naps with their eyes opened, So the next time you spot them zoning out, they could actually be catching some Zzz’s!

Video via The Noodle Pups

If you’re fortunate enough to catch your Cavy’s eyelids shut, you should be extremely proud of how far your friendship has come— because this only means your pet Guinea Pig trusts you enough to shut their eyes and he/she is relaxed around your presence ☺



2. Halt Right There!  A common sight for all Guinea Pigs; stopping in their tracks abruptly. This behaviour is most likely due to a sudden noise or unfamiliar movement in the midst of their surroundings. Freezing is your Cavy’s way of going unnoticed, yet another handy prey instinct!

 "Is It Safe Now Buddy?"

Fun Fact #2      Guinea Pigs can recognize and sense danger from Cavy friends around the same area, a sudden stop could be sending a message of eminent or potential threat(s)— leaving a trail of halting Piggies, all at the same time.



3. Running Away There are two essentials to surviving in wild as preys; if you can’t stay low, you run and hide. The faster you run, the sooner you get to safety. Take some time for your Guinea Pig(s) to familiarize with you, and this behaviour gradually improves as they ease up.
What Is My Guinea Pig Saying?
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Hot Tip      For starters, try not to startle them with sudden movements as you try picking them up. Be patient and don’t despair if your Piggies start bolting the minute you come close— that's just a natural reflex J



4. Popcorn  A series of movements similar to that of a Binky (Quick hops and twists) for Rabbits. Well Guinea Pigs are the same! When you see this, know that your pet Guinea Pig is excited and extremely happy about something. All that popping and bouncing around has had this behaviour fondly nicknamed Pop-corning.



5. Licking Being the fastidious creatures that Guinea Pigs are, most do not require a water bath unless it is absolutely necessary. Self-grooming is carried out by a series of licking throughout the day, a behaviour not unlike Dogs, Cats, Rabbits, Hamsters or any furry Pet. When they do lick YOU however, it is a clear sign of affection— as how they would groom their friends and family.
What Is My Guinea Pig Trying To Say
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6. Rubbing Bottoms By dragging or rubbing their bottoms on surfaces, Guinea Pigs mark their territories. A pretty adorable and ticklish sight as their scent glands are actually located where their tiny hypothetical tail would have been (they do not have tails!). Excretion of natural oil/grease is how a Guinea Pig leave its scent around. Dirt or oil build up may cause a stench and even lead to infections if left unattended, so be sure to keep their scent glands clean! 
What Is My Guinea Pig Saying?
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Hot Tip #2      Love the smell of coconuts? An effective solution for cleaning a Guinea Pig’s scent gland is using Coconut Oil. Leave a small amount on their scent glands to break up the oil or dirt build-up, then clean off gently with a damp towel. Dry thoroughly after!   



7. Heads Up! Plain observation might bring no explanation to this behaviour, however, studies have shown that this is an act of dominance within a group of Guinea Pigs— the higher your head is elevated, the more respect you are demanding from peers.

Fun Fact #3      This behaviour can also be seen when a male Guinea Pig is trying to display his readiness to mate!



8. Standing On Hind Legs — Higher ground always gives you a better overview or your surroundings, agreed? When Guinea Pigs are standing on their tiny hind legs and sniffing the air, they are trying to pick out the scent of a certain location, all whilst getting a bird’s eye view of its surroundings.
What Is My Guinea Pig Saying?
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9. Chewing Chewing is a huge part in any Guinea Pig's life. They chew on food and toys, which keeps their ever-growing teeth in check. But if you do find your Cavies chewing on their own cages, there's a high chance they're trying to express boredom and the need to be let out!
What Is My Guinea Pig Saying?
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Hot Tip #3      Keep your Guinea Pigs entertained by placing sufficient toys and obstacle courses in their homes. When you are home, allocate some free-roaming time outside of their cage/enclosure.


Sounds


  Now that we’ve covered the common basic body language of Guinea Pigs, let’s move on to noises they make!


1. Wheeking This is no typo error, a pretty well known noise to Cavy owners. Guinea Pigs are actually pretty vocal when expressing themselves, despite being preys in the wild— Wheeking refers to a sound your Guinea Pig may make when they are extremely excited.

Wheeking is mostly heard when they notice you holding out their favourite food, or even as a greeting when you’re home. At times, you may hear soft noises and vibration of their little bodies when you pat them, a sign of comfort and trust.☺



2. Shrieking & Squealing Sounds not to be mistaken with Wheeking, namely because they mean the complete opposite of one another. Sharp squeals or shrieks, even low rumbling noises is a Guinea Pig’s way of saying “I do not like what you are doing, stop it!” Also another way of warning their fellow Cavies when they sense danger or threat. If you do not sense anything out of the norm, check to be sure your Cavy isn’t hurt anywhere!

And if you do see any baring of teeth, steer clear, because it could mean that it's really angry, or feels really threatened by something. Do not attempt to hold your Guinea Pig at this moment, give them some time to calm down!  


What Is My Guinea Pig Saying?
There you have it, some movements and noises explained for you to better understand and bond with your Guinea Pigs, spend a little more time with them and you'd start to notice all these common behaviours. This time, you'd be pretty well prepared. If you are a first time Cavy owner, perhaps you might want to start off with an American Short HairJ




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Got a tip of your own? We’d love to share them with the world! Your voices are important to us and the Pets community! Our readers are encouraged to share their  Pet-related reviews of a place and its services, experiences, even lifestyle tips and tricks to better our Pets lives, on our platform, one paw at a time. Be a part of an educational and informative Pets community because at ThePetsDialogue, your voices could make a huge difference on a global scale.

Write to us at hello@thepetsdialogue.com today!

Our website is a work in progress, however, if you did find our articles interesting please do feel free to share! For more Pet care tips and other Pet-related articles, head to www.thepetsdialogue.com 



Disclaimer


This article was written with informational purposes, as you know, we’d love to share our collective research and experiences as fellow Pet owners and lovers. It is not meant to alternate in any way as advice or diagnosis of Professionals. 


ThePetsDialogue claims no credit for images posted on this article unless otherwise displayed/stated. All rights go to respective owners as mentioned. If you do not wish for your image(s) to appear here do drop us an e-mail and it will be removed promptly. If you do wish to use any of our original published information, you are welcome to contact us!

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Japanese Spitz Dog Breed: The Playful, Fox Like, All White Dog

Japanese Spitz Dog Breed: The Playful, Fox Like, All White Dog


Are you someone with an innate love for all-white animals? Even if you don’t have a particular fancy for that, most of us would agree that it is undeniably hard to overlook the elegance and beauty of these snow-white coats— That’s exactly what crosses our minds when we see a Japanese Spitz. You’d wanna stroke them immediately, even if it’s just to feel that fluff between your fingers
The all-white coats accentuates their darker toned facial features, don't you think?



The Japanese Spitz


The given name of this Dog breed clearly indicates that these Spitz originated from Japan, although some sources may dispute that fact. It is true however, that Japanese breeders only began developing this breed from 1920s to 1930s. This development of the Japanese Spitz started with crossbreeding a number of different Spitz type Dogs together— and in 1921, the Dogs were first exhibited in a Tokyo Dog show. During 1925 to 1936, smaller white Spitz breeds were imported and introduced into the breeding program, in attempts to further improve this breed. The first breed standard of the Japanese Spitz was written after the World War II.
Samoyed vs Japanese Spitz
Left: Samoyed, Right: Japanese Spitz
 By nature of course, the Japanese Spitz was first recognized by the JKC (Japan Kennel Club). Soon after the breed gained popularity in 1950s, Japanese Spitz Dogs began to spread worldwide— beginning with European countries first. This Dog breed was only introduced to America in the 1970s. Although the breed is recognized by many other Dog Registries across the world, its similarities with the SamoyedAmerican Eskimo Dog and White Pomeranian has rendered the AKC (American Kennel Club) unable to recognize the Japanese Spitz as a breed of its own.

Fun Fact #1      The Japanese Spitz is usually fondly referred to as a “Mini Samoyed”. Well in our eyes, it’s a much larger all-white Pomeranian— Because Spitz family, right?



Japanese Spitz Dog Appearance


As we've mentioned earlier, encountering a Japanese Spitz is unequivocally similar to starring at an eternal wonderland of snow; the whiter, the more effect.

Size — Medium sized Dog measuring 25 to 40 cm in height, differing in gender (females are usually slightly smaller). The average weight of an adult Japanese Spitz ranges from 5 to 10 kgs.

Features — Lush and dense double coat of pure White hair, accompanied by a handsomely wedged face. To top these, their eyes, lips foot pads, nails and nose are complimentary contrasted with Jet Black. Almost too dreamy, we must say.
Happy Japanese Spitz Dog
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  Japanese Spitz's eyes can also sometimes be a shade of Brown, but nonetheless sitting bright and  oval shape with white lashes!

Colour — The Japanese Spitz breed is distinctive for one colour — White.

Fun Fact #2      The pretty oval eyes of a Japanese Spitz are adorably referred to as ginko nuts ☺



Grooming A Japanese Spitz


One might think that a pristine coat as such would require a lot of effort to maintain. On the contrary, you'd be elated to know that dirt and dust do not adhere on these luscious white coats. However, regular brushing is still especially required because of its medium to long length— Using a slicker brush, deep comb through your Japanese Spitz's double coat once a week, or twice during shedding periods (twice a year). This helps to rid any loose hairs and prevent matting and tangles.
Keep their coats clean and fresh by running them through a bath once every few months or whenever necessary. Nails are to be trimmed occasionally, and should not be heard clacking on the ground.

HOT TIP      To avoid obvious staining around the eyes and mouth, check for tearing and/or food remenants regularly. Using a cotton ball and Vet approved cleanser, swab these areas carefully. Also check their ears for buildup, and repeat the above cleansing steps.  

If you are unsure of how to perform these tasks, visit a trusted Groomer for professional grooming services.



Japanese Spitz Personality


Japanese Spitz Dogs are active and playful. They eventually develop loyalty and devotion to their owners and require a lot of attention— However, this breed of Dogs are extremely adaptable and versatile to various living conditions i.e. apartment space. If you do live in an apartment, be sure to include regular walks and play time outdoors. Their eagerness to please has many owners realizing just how much potential fun their Japanese Spitz had in them all along, even during training!
 Due to their territorial nature of being wary to unrecognized people, Japanese Spitzs are surprisingly gret guard Dogs. While it may take some time for them to get used to relatives and friends, this cab be overcome gradually with frequent encounters. Proper training and bonding ensures you a loyal companion protecting your home at the same time!

Fun Fact #3      A Japanese Spitz can live an average of 10 to 16 years, making them one of the Dog breeds with the longest lifespan!☺



Owning A Japanese Spitz


Human holding a Japanese Spitz puppy
Source
Charming and lovable, Japanese Spitz Dogs are hard to pass up, even more so for their quick adaptability to living spaces. Research and preparations are still necessary beforehand, it is also important to not ignore a Japanese Spitz need for quite a bit of attention. When neglected or not properly trained, they may become territorial with their owners and become destructive. Don’t neglect your Pets, bring them out for a good time!



You might also be interested in these:

Dog Obedience And Training: Classes And Schools To Attend In Singapore!

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Dog Behaviour And Body Language: What Is My Dog Trying To Tell Me?

Dog Life Hacks: Ten Useful Tips For Every Dog Owner




Your Stories Can Be Heard Too


Got a Corgi of your own? Your voices are important to us and the Pets community! Our readers are encouraged to share their  Pet-related reviews of a place and its services, experiences, even lifestyle tips and tricks to better our Pets lives, on our platform, one paw at a time. Be a part of an educational and informative Pets community because at ThePetsDialogue, your voices could make a huge difference on a global scale.

Write to us at hello@thepetsdialogue.com today!

Our website is a work in progress, however, if you did find our articles interesting please do feel free to share! For more Pet care tips and other Pet-related articles, head to www.thepetsdialogue.com ☺



Disclaimer


This article was written with informational purposes, as you know, we’d love to share our collective research and experiences as fellow Pet owners and lovers. It is not meant to alternate in any way as advice or diagnosis of Professionals.

ThePetsDialogue claims no credit for images posted on this article unless otherwise displayed/stated. All rights go to respective owners as mentioned. If you do not wish for your image(s) to appear here do drop us an e-mail and it will be removed promptly. If you do wish to use any of our original published information, you are welcome to contact us!